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See also Cudgegong Locality

Cudgegong:


Joyner (1972, p. 12) provides the following population statistics for Cudgegong:

1862: 1595, 1871: 2342, 1891: 2519, and 1901: 2985.

1870
TOWN AND DISTRICT
SALE OF LANDS
AT CUDGEGONG
A SALE of Crown Lands was held at the Police Office on Tuesday, 7th June inst. There was a very large attendance and a brisk competition, especially for town lots in the Cudgegong township, which realised higher prices than the Mudgee town lots. Seventy town and country lots were disposed of as below:

AT CUDGEGONG
Lot Acre Rod Perches Price per lot Purchaser
47 1 3 38 £8 Mary Ann Hardy
48 1 2 11 23 John ????ly
49 1 2 9 32 “ “
50 1 1 22 21 John Cox
51 1 1 3 26 ???? ????
53 1 0 29 20.6S Maree Carr

TOWN LOTS
Lot Acre Rod Perches Price per lot Purchaser
53 2 28 £27 10s John Cox
54 2 9 16.5 E Readford
55 1 30 16 .0 Wm Readford
58 1 17 15.15 Wm Readford
59 1 12 15.15 Wm Readford
60 2 35 26.10 Wm Wilkins
61 2 17 27 .10 Wm Wilkins
62 2 10 ½ 11.15 Wm McGrath
63 2 0 12.3 Thos Best
64 2 0 12.3 Thos Best
65 1 30 12 .1 Thos McGrath
66 3 1 ½ 19.0 John Hume
67 2 30 ½ 12.0 Jas Roberts
68 1 1 10 21.0 Thos Tarrant
69 1 0 7 23.0 Edward Readford
70 2 38 23.0 John Nevell


In 1870 Cudgegong had two inns, two stores, two blacksmith’s shops, two private houses, one school and one post office. All the buildings are on one side of the only street in the town. The schoolhouse is also used as a church which has a large unfenced graveyard beside it
(Random notes of a wandering reporter, 1870).

In 1870 the town is bounded on the south by a creek which is crossed by a plank; on the east by the river which could not be crossed in July due to flooding; on the north by a hill up which a deeply muddy road winds; and on the west by another hill. The town itself had around twenty men, twenty women and an indefinite number of children. The writer of the 1870 article thought children and pigs were the ‘standard products of the place’ as both ran around freely enjoying the endless mud of the place
(Random notes of a wandering reporter, 1870).

GOLD AT CUDGEGONG AND CARWELL.-During the last few weeks several small parcels of gold, varying from two to seven ounces, have been brought to Mudgee from Cudgegong and Carwell. Last Monday, a party sold a small parcel to the Joint-Stock Bank. From inquiries we have made, it appears that a few men have been working at each of the above places for some time past, and have made from 12s. to 16s. per day each man. On Saturday, two men washed out 11 dwts. from a claim on the Cudgegong, near Mr. Wilkins' public-house. On Friday, a party having to dig a small hole, about eight inches deep, situated near the road, was induced from the appearance of the dirt to wash a dish, and was surprised to find several coarse specks of gold. There is no doubt that the whole of the district, including Rylstone, is one vast gold-field, which will before long he occupied by a busy mining population. Western Post.

Cudgegong Grev ille’s Post Office Dirtectory 1872 Page 146
Distance 145 milesWest of Sydney
Mail closes at General Post Office daily 4 p.m.
Mail arrives at Post Town daily (Monday excepted) 10.15 a.m.
Mail leaves for Sydney daily (Saturday excepted) noon
Mail arrives at Sydney daily 7 a.m.
Route - Rail Wallerawang, Cobb's coach Cudgegong

SURNAME
CHRISTIAN
OCCUPATION
ADDRESS
POST TOWN
ARMSTRONG
Robert
farmer
Oakey Ck.
Cudgegong
ATKINSON
John
farmer
Limestone
Cudgegong
ATKINSON
Thomas
farmer
Gulgamree
Cudgegong
BARTON
James
farmer
Red Hill
Cudgegong
BAYLIS
Richard
farmer
Stoney Pinch
Cudgegong
BECKMORE
Wm.
farmer
Cudgegong River
Cudgegong
BOWMAN
William
farmer
Tomabutta
Cudgegong
BOWN
Charles
farmer
Cudgegong River
Cudgegong
BROWN
Alexander
farmer
Cudgegong River
Cudgegong
CLARKSON
Thomas
farmer
Oakey Ck.
Cudgegong
COX
John
storekeeper
---
Cudgegong
FOSTER
James
carrier
---
Cudgegong
FREEMAN
Thomas
farmer
Aaron's Pass
Cudgegong
GORE
William
farmer
Cudgegong Ck.
Cudgegong
HANCHARD
Robert
farmer
Little Plain
Cudgegong
HARDY
Charles
farmer
---
Cudgegong
HARRIS
Henry
farmer
Aaron's Pass
Cudgegong
HENNESSY
Richard
farmer
Aaron's Pass
Cudgegong
HUBBARD
Henry
farmer
Tabrabucca
Cudgegong
IMBER
William
butcher
---
Cudgegong
LEEDER
Robert
farmer
Tabrabucca
Cudgegong
LEWIS
John
bootmaker
---
Cudgegong
MASTERS
Samuel
farmer
Red Hill
Cudgegong
NEVELL
James
squatter
---
Cudgegong
NEVELL
Thomas
squatter
Crooked Corner
Cudgegong
OLDFIELD
William
farmer
Four-Mile Flat
Cudgegong
PERRAM
James
farmer
Oakey Ck.
Cudgegong
PITT
Joseph
farmer
Bridge Flat
Cudgegong
RHODES
John
farmer
Limestone
Cudgegong
ROGERS
William
farmer
Cudgegong Ck.
Cudgegong
SHEPHERD
Henry
storekeeper
---
Cudgegong
SKINNER
Francis
farmer
Four-Mile Flat
Cudgegong
WARD
James
innkeeper
---
Cudgegong
WILKINS
Able
blacksmith
---
Cudgegong
WILKINS
Thomas
wheelwright
---
Cudgegong
WILKINS
William
innkeeper
---
Cudgegong
WOODS
Robert
farmer
Limestone
Cudgegong




In 1873 Cudgegong was said to be eighteen miles from Mudgee and was the first coach stage (Golding around Mudgee, 1873).

In 1873 Cudgegong had two hotels and two stores (Gold mining around Mudgee, 1873).

A few gold reefs had been discovered in 1873 a mile east of the village on the river and a crushing plant was being erected having been ordered by Messrs Mott and Harvey (Gold mining around Mudgee, 1873).


From Ilford I rode to Cunningham's Creek, a few miles beyond the town, and put up at Sid Brown's hotel, where the accommodation is good. The following morning I had an early start. Tho distance to Mudgee is 33 miles. The road winds over hilly country the greater part of the way. Shortly after leaving Cunningham’s Creek I ascended a hill tolerably steep, bearing the strange name of Aaron's Poss, a place which has since become very familiar to your readers, as tho spot where tho Mudgee Mail was robbed on the 29th of May. It is just such a place as would be chosen by bushrangers, being in a wild uninhabited part of country. Twelve miles from Cunningham’s Creek, Cudgegong was reached. Cudgegong is a small township, possessing a few good buildings in free-stone, two good hotels and stores, a church, and a court-house. The oldest inhabitant, Mr. William Wilkins, is the host of the principal hotel. He informed me that he built the first public-house, did the first bit of blacksmithing, and killed the first bullock in the town. He is a jovial sort, of follow, one’s idea of mine host; but I understand that be is about to retire to a nice free-stone private house that he has built for himself nearer the creek (Empire, 29 June 1874, p. 4). [For full account of this journey see Wallerawang to Mudgee 1874]

Two miles from Cudgegong I passed a place called Tunnabutta, Masters’ comfortable homestead and farm. Four miles beyond, I arrived at Stony Pinch, where Bayliss's farms are situated in a romantic position, and nearly surrounded by high mountains
(Empire, 29 June 1874, p. 4). [For full account of this journey see Wallerawang to Mudgee 1874]


In 1875 was said to be situated nine miles from Rylstone, twenty two miles from Mudgee, and one hundred and fifty from Sydney (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).

In 1875 about one hundred and fifty people lived at Cudgegong. The school and church were both well established by 1875 (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).

In 1875 Cudgegong had two public houses, one blacksmith one store and one butcher’s shop (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).

In 1875 the copper mines near Cudgegong, at Oakey Creek, were active with a number of persons employed at the site (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).

During one week in November 1875 the following teams of wool passed through Cudgegong on their way to Sydney: four tons of greasy wool from Coolah (Cox), four tons greasy wool (Wilton), eight and a half tons wool from Yamble Station, twenty tons greasy wool from Calga Station (Small), five tons greasy wool (Atkinson), ten tons washed wool (Flood), five tons greasy wool (Mrs Hartford), seven tons washed wool (Robertson), four tons washed wool (Watts), plus several bales from McMahon and McAlister (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).

The following teams passed through Cudgegong from the up-country stations in the last few weeks of November, 1875: 12 tons greasy wool from the Tooloon station (McMahon's): 10 tons greasy wool from Dahomey (Alison's), through the agency of Dickinson's warehouse; 120 bales washed wool, of an aggregate weight of 16 tons 10 cwt., from the Guntawang station (Richard Rouse) ; 3 tons washed wool (G. If Cox's) ; 7 tons greasy fleece from Calga station (Small's); 7 tons washed wool'(Bowman's) ; 14 tons washed fleece from Carwell station (Chambers, Splatt, and Co.) ; 80 bales washed wool (George Rouse's), weighing 11 tons, and shorn at the Guntawang woolshed; 52 bales on the one team, weighing 6 tons 8 cwt. washed wool from the Cooyal station (S. A. Blackmun's) ; 15 tons greasy wool, from the Merrigon Station ; 8 ton washed fleece, from Pine Ridge (D. Watt's) ; 4 tons (A and E Flood's) ; 3 tons washed fleece (George Rouse's), shorn at Guntawang ; 4 ½ tons washed wool (C. B. Lowe's), consigned to Mort and Co. for shipment abroad; and, 5 tons, from the Bothero station (Neville's). Besides these several teams passed laden with wool from Dickson and Son's warehouse at Mudgee (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).


By November 1875 the mines which had existed in Cudgegong had been abandoned (Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford, 1875).


The following wool teams passed through Cudgegong village in the first week in December 1875, with most of the wool being destined for London: 6 tons greasy wool (Alison's), from the Wingadee station; 4 ½ tons greasy wool (Wiseman's); 32 bales, from Erringinber (John Bonner's), of an aggregate weight of 5 tons, and consigned to Mort and Co. , 44 bales greasy wool (Ferguson's), through the agency of Dickson's warehouse; 4 tons 17 cwt. of Richard Reeve’s, from Grattai station; 8 bales (Markey's) greasy wool; 6 tons (Traqueer's) greasy, from tho Merri Merri station; and also a quantity of wool belonging to Bralby, Wilson, Scully, and Watt. About 200 bales left Dickson's warehouse during the week, und passed through Cudgegong
(Rylstone Cudgegong & Ilford, 1875).

Payable gold was struck at Cudgegong in September 1895 and batteries were being erected (Rylstone, 1895).

On Tour by a Country Candidate (1895)

Mr Wall spoke afterwards, and we left for Cudgegong, travelling all the way over a good road, past a number of homesteads and residences, and eventually descending what is called Erin's Pass into Cudgegong, where a stay was made at Burt's Royal Hotel, whilst Will Farrar drove on back to Rylstone. Mr Burt once resided, years ago, in Richmond. At the meeting that night more than one old Hawkesburyite put in an appearance. There was Mr R Norris, and another brother of Mr H Readford's, who, whilst being, born in the. Hawkesbury District, out Yarramundi Way, and whilst being familiar with the names of all the old hands here, has not visited his native place for a little over 50 years. Good, assistance was rendered by Messrs Foister, Perrum, Eames, Francis, Gaw, J and A Neville, and Tom Walford. A jolly night was spent after the meeting, and after sleeping the sleep of the just we went out at early morning to discover that snow had been falling on the previous night. A well-known mountain in the vicinity, rejoicing in the name of Cobbee, or something of that sort, was snow-capped and glorious, and the air was chill and raw enough to suit a Laplander. Cudgegong in the good old days - like Ilford and many, other places situate along the main Mudgee Road - was a stirring business centre - but with the advance of the iron horse, and in a measure the falling off in the supply of gold, its glories have in a great measure departed, and it remains there a relic of the past, a monument set up to the days which WERE. However, it is far from being dead yet, and as there is a likelihood of a heap of capital being put into some of the reefs in the neighbourhood, some stir should be caused in good old Cudgegong in the not dim and distant future. On Sunday morning, accompanied by Mr Foister, who runs a butter-factory near Cudgegong, and who is held in the highest respect everywhere about, start was made for the Crudine (Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 10 August 1895, p. 6). [For full account of this tour please see On Tour by a Country Candidate (1895) ]

In December 1897 all were busy harvesting in the Cudgegong area. Mr James Pitt was expected to have around 2000 bushels of wheat. The Pitt Bros of Rosehill and Mr J Hextell also had fine crops. Tuesday 14 December was expected to be quite lively as it was payday at both the Co-Operative Factory and the Creamery. The mines were going along nicely. The copper mine was expected to have all the water out in coming days and the verdict would be then (Rylstone Express, 11 December, 1897).

The following appears in the Rylstone Express on Friday January 5 1900:


CUDGEGONG.
(From our own correspondent,)

Here we are, the beginning of new year, and hot and dry still. The sur­rounding district looks very bad in­deed.

The New Year and other holidays did not cause any sports in Cudgegong, but there was a picnic at Stoney Pinch today (Monday), and a ball tonight at Mr. John Skinner's. The parents round about all joined together to give their children a day's outing. This is as it should be. I noticed a fair number going from this part, and I consider that Cudgegong could have such a day annually, if all the families worked together.

Most of our farmers have their wheat down, but not carted into the barn. Some of the crops are very good, whilst others are pinched very much. Mr. James Jennings is stripping all his paddocks, which saves a lot of labour. The corn crops are looking very well thus far, but cannot hang out much longer. Should we not get rain soon there will be no late crops around here.
Mr. Walter Readford is on business bent, and purchased Mr. Abel Wil­kins' property down, here. This will cause some more building for those who occupy the premises now.

Cudgegong Cooees 11 January 1901 Rylstone Express p 11Cudgegong Cooees 18 January 1901 Rylstone Express p 7



In 1919 Vincent Roy Burns was a storekeeper at Cudgegong (Rylstone Area History of Settlement, p. 61).

A History of Rylstone 1920 - 1988 (p. 4) states:

Cudgegong was a village for the most part just across the shire boundary where the Cudgegong Creek crossed the road. Windamere Dam construction has wiped out the village and the settled area of the valley. There were no civic buildings apart from the church and school, which were of stone. In later years a public hall of corrugated iron served the community. Toolamalang homestead, built by the Jennings family, was a fine stone homestead. The church having been built as a denominational school church, was one of the first opened across the mountains. A butter factory and a coaching stop made Cudgegong a busy centre. Modern transport saw its decline to a pub and store before its final extinction.

Bibliography

Gold at Cudgegong and Carwell. (1861, December 9), p. 5. Retrieved June 1, 2010 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13058076

Gold mining around Mudgee (1873, 22 December). The Sydney Morning Herald, p. 7.


Random notes of a wandering reporter. (1870, July 9). Sydney Morning Herald, p. 5. Retrieved July 1, 2010 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13207977

Rylstone. (1895, September 21). Sydney Morning Herald, p. 9. Retrieved June 1, 2010 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14017678

Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford. (1875, November 22). Sydney Morning Herald, p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13367754

Rylstone, Cudgegong and Ilford. (1875, December 1). The Sydney Morning Herald, p. 7. Retrieved June 1, 2010 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13368301

Rylstone Cudgegong & Ilford. (1875, December 8). Sydney Morning Herald, p. 9. Retrieved July 1, 2010 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28400652


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